Dr. Scott Rocklage’s advice for making and keeping quality business contacts

Dr. Scott Rocklage is no stranger to working with other people in business. With over 30 years as a medical professional, he has co-authored over 100 pure reviewed articles.

In addition to his purely academic collaboration, he is also inventor or co-inventor on 30 different patents for the medical field. Working with others has been a major part of his life, and there are a few key pieces of wisdom he would like to share with the world. Read more: Scott Racklage | Bloomberg

While he has always focused on other people in his business practice, you still insist that he regrets not working more with other people on critical projects. Specifically, hiring and recruiting the right people to be on a team is absolutely crucial to the long-term success of the organization.

This goes beyond the nuances of the individual’s skill; it encompasses their ability to work with the other people on the team as well as the general demeanor. Learn more about Nathaniel Ru: http://5amventures.com/team/scott-m-rocklage-phd/

This plays into his second piece of advice. Even though collaboration with other people is vital, not all people are a good fit. You can’t expect someone to change their fundamental personality traits and quirks, even with constructive criticism, feedback, and performance reviews.

In most cases, if an employee is not a good fit for a business that relationship should be separated sooner rather than later. The individual and the organization are usually much better off working with people who they are not at odds with at all times.

Finally, Dr. Rocklage encourages entrepreneurs to not be afraid of measured risk-taking. In a sign says we can measure data and predict an outcome.

Most scientists are confident in their ability to measure and record information, yet for some reason, they decide that once they enter the business world they no longer trust these instincts. It’s perfectly acceptable take a risk on yourself or an employee, there will always be more opportunities and the risk is almost always worth the reward.

Even with a lifetime of collaboration, Dr. Rocklage recognizes that he could have still work with people more frequently. It is clear that based on this experience, the importance of quality partners and colleagues cannot be understated.